Video Translate

Use Video Translate to practice translating Japanese sentences.

How to use Video Translate

Translate one sentence at a time.

Type your reply in English:

And press the ‘Enter’ key when the percentage turns green:

You can continue to the next sentence when your reply is 80% correct. But try to give perfect answers to get a higher score!

Click on the Japanese sentences for hints:

And mouse over previous sentences for details. This will not affect your score.

To ‘pin’ the hint so it doesn’t disappear when you move your mouse away, click the Japanese word a second time.

If the setting for “Text in Japanese script” is On, you can see the Romaji by moving the mouse over the Japanese word. This will not affect your score:

Or to see the entire text in Romaji, change the setting “Text in Japanese script” to Off:

Video window

Press ‘Play’ on the video window to hear the word again:

Use the slider to adjust the volume:

Settings

The “Settings” link is at the top of the Video Translate. It is also on the My Lessons page and the Lesson page.

Each of these settings is described below.


                                            Text in Japanese script
Purpose: Show the Japanese text in either Japanese script or Romaji.

Default: On
Takes effect immediately: Yes

When selected, the text is shown in script, i.e. hiragana, katakana and kanji.


                                                   Enable video
Purpose: Enable or disable the video window.

Default: On
Takes effect immediately: Yes

Useful if you want to do translations with the sound off.


                                                  Auto-play video
Purpose: Controls whether the video for each Japanese sentence plays automatically.

Default: On
Takes effect immediately: Yes

When not selected, the video will only play when you press the “Play” button on the video window.

This setting has no effect if “Enable video” is Off

 

 

 

Real Japanese.
It’s casual Japanese,
but not slang.

Find out more here about Mark Smith's book >>
The Top 500 Japanese Words.
Ranked by how often they appear on the internet.


View on Amazon.com >>